What might a safer Elm Grove junction look like?

When I was collecting signatures for my petition about the road crash hotspot at the bottom of Elm Grove, a few people asked how redesigning the road could improve safety. How different could it really be?

Following the council’s invitation to submit ideas for their forthcoming review of this junction, I got together with a few friends and we have come up with two options for a safer junction, plus some other ideas to think about. I’ll be emailing all these ideas to the council’s Travel Planning team tomorrow, just in time for their 1st November deadline.

If you think these are good suggestions, there’s still time for you to drop them a line to say so – feel free to link to this blog post if you want to. Or, of course, send in your own thoughts about what’s wrong with the junction and how it could be improved.

Preferred option – London-style

lewes-rd-option-1

Move the central islands on Lewes Road, both north and south of Elm Grove, to create a wide, protected, two-way cycle track on the western side of Lewes Road, connecting with the cycle paths around the Level and continuing past Union Road, Park Crescent and Elm Grove, as far as (approximately) Kendrick’s Property Services.

Convert the bus stop opposite to a floating bus stop, and provide a signalised crossing for southbound cyclists to enable them to join the two-way track as they emerge from behind the bus stop.

Here’s a picture of a similar crossing already in place in London:

parliament-bike-crossing

Introduce a two-way protected cycle track at the bottom of Elm Grove, accessible both from Elm Grove and Islingword Road (provide a cyclist-only cut-through at the bottom of Islingword Road).

Use signals for cyclists on the two-way track to allow them to turn left or right into Elm Grove (via Islingword Road) and for cyclists turning left or right out of Elm Grove.

Add a pedestrian crossing just south of Elm Grove. This will make it quicker and easer to access the GP surgery. Straighten the crossing north of Elm Grove, as the distance to be crossed would be reduced by the width of the cycle track. Remove all the railings.

Option 2: Copenhagen-style

lewes-rd-option-2

One-way raised or wand-protected cycle lanes on both sides of Lewes Road and Elm Grove.

Vehicle traffic stopped further back from the junction than cyclists and left turning vehicles held, with a large “mixing zone”, giving cyclists a clear head start as the lights change.

Other ideas

Minimal changes

If there is to be no alteration at all to the road layout, the council could still introduce:

  • Advance green signals for cyclists, or simultaneous green for cyclists
  • Low level lights, so that cyclists can easily see the signals
  • Traffic lights which hold vehicles from making a left turn into Elm Grove until cyclists have had a chance to clear the junction

A broader view

In order to allow the structural changes outlined above, it may be necessary to reduce the number of vehicles passing through the junction. The council could explore the following possibilities for doing that:

  • Preventing vehicle left turns into Elm Grove (except for buses). This may require some other changes to prevent rat-running.
  • Making the southbound left-hand lane into a bus lane.
  • Preventing vehicle right turns out of Southover Street, to minimise traffic turning left into Union Road.
  • Making Lewes Road one-way northbound (except for buses, taxis and cycles), and  Upper Lewes Road one-way westbound (except for cycles)

I am aware that the brief for the council’s review is to focus on efficiency, and that the budget is tight. Our suggestions may seem unrealistic. However, I think there is a very strong case for designing streets that feel safe for cycling, in order to enable a significant shift away from private car use and towards cycling for most short journeys.

All the evidence from Europe is that protected infrastructure provides that sense of safety, and that it is possible to create the circumstances for a much higher modal share for cycling than we currently see in the UK.

More people cycling would relieve congestion in the city and therefore improve the overall efficiency of the road network. It would also make a big contribution to our air pollution problem and give more people an opportunity to take everyday exercise.

Even if the council does not currently have enough money to transform the junction fully, I think it would be worth producing a tested and costed design that would afford adequate protection for people on bikes, so that they are able to quickly bid for the necessary funds in the future.

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One Comment on “What might a safer Elm Grove junction look like?”

  1. brightonbycycle says:

    Reblogged this on Bricycles.


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