As a woman, I have no country

I’ll be outside Hove Town Hall this afternoon, making a last ditch attempt to persuade enough of our local councillors to vote against the proposed cuts to local services.

The agenda of the meeting is long and complicated. The 54 voting members of the council will be making decisions that affect everyone in the city, but most citizens are unaware of the meeting taking place. Of those who are, I imagine most have not read the documents, or managed to grasp the essential issues. I’m a highly educated person, with a frankly abnormal interest in the workings of local government, and I think I will struggle to follow the proceedings in the meeting.

I had hoped to try and spell out the key issues in this post, but I am hampered by the fact that the amendments to the budget from the three political groups have not yet been published on the council website (as I write at 10am, six hours before the meeting begins). I don’t know if councillors have seen them, but I think it’s ridiculous that the public are denied access to the information we need to form an opinion, let alone have an influence.

Two of the parties have issued press releases about their amendments. The Labour group’s press release describes one effect of their amendments as being to “reverse cuts to social care”, exactly the same wording as is used by the Greens in proposing an increase in council tax by 4.75%.

However, none of the amendments mentioned by Labour actually touch the major cuts to adult social care that will take place if the budget goes through as proposed by the Policy and Resources Committee (where Labour and Conservative councillors combined to strip out the extra council tax rise suggested by the Greens).

I assume (though I can’t be sure until the amendments are officially published) that the cuts to social care they refer to are the proposals to reduce the budget for services to children with disabilities by £68,000 and divert £41,000 of school funding into this area. I agree that families with disabled children cannot afford to have their services cut, but I think it is misleading of Labour to present a change to less than 0.05% of the council’s budget as “reversing cuts to social care”.

The Conservative amendments, as described by them, make similarly minimal changes to the budget proposals. In common with Labour, they propose to reverse the cut to the respite care budget (though they identify this as amounting to £84,000, a figure I cannot find in the latest budget papers at all), to reverse the cut to community and voluntary sector grants, to retain the subsidy for Able and Willing and to cut funding to services for travellers.

Obviously, I don’t agree that respite care, community grants or supported employment should be cut. But I am horrified at the way the bulk of the job and service cuts in the proposed budget have been completely sidelined by the opposition parties.

The Green Party have not yet announced any amendments, other than to say that they will be proposing the 4.75% council tax increase again this afternoon.

This proposal, the only one that even comes close to addressing the core issues at stake, is unfortunately bound to be defeated at the council meeting.

For the non-obsessed citizen, all the arcane procedures, all the high drama of last minute amendments and surprise manoeuvres are impenetrable, boring and irrelevant. All the puff pieces about how heroic rescues have been made by this or that party are pretty distasteful.

For some of the citizens with learning disabilities who today can get friendly, helpful support with finding and keeping a job from fairly-paid, experienced and dedicated council staff, the issue is very simple. From April, that support will start to be withdrawn. Over the next few years, those staff will lose their jobs. Their knowledge, skill and experience will be lost to our community.

For some of the older citizens who today have the option of moving into residential care homes paid for from our common funds when they need to, the issue is very simple. From April, there will be fewer residential places available because there will be £1,150,000 less to pay for them.

For some of the people with learning disabilities and older people who today enjoy a sense of friendship and community at council-funded day centres, the issue is very simple. From April, their centres will be at risk of closure, their friendships will be disrupted and threatened.

For most people in the city, politics is not a game. Most people know – and the behaviour of our councillors over the last few months has demonstrated this rather dismally – that whatever politicians say, in the end they will sell you down the river if it brings them some glory.

I’m reading Virginia Woolf’s essay Three Guineas at the moment. I’m working on a collaborative banner for International Women’s Day, featuring a famous quote from that work – “As a woman, I have no country. As a woman I want no country. As a woman my country is the whole world.”

Woolf talks about the choices facing educated women in the early 20th century, as the opportunity to participate in political and public life opened up for the first time. She reminds her readers that women have achieved great things despite (or perhaps because of) their lack of access to the structures of power and privilege designed by and for men.

She talks of “the four great teachers of the daughters of educated men – poverty, chastity, derision and freedom from unreal loyalties”. I apologise for quoting at great length, but I think this advice remains relevant and pertinent for anyone – local councillors, for example – who hopes to make a difference in this deeply dysfunctional society:

“By poverty is meant enough money to live upon. That is, you must earn enough to be independent of any other human being and buy that modicum of health, leisure, knowledge and so on that is needed for the full development of body and mind. But no more. Not a penny more.

By chastity is meant that when you have made enough to live on by your profession you must refuse to sell your brain for the sake of money. That is you must cease to practise your profession, or practise it for the sake of research and experiment; or, if you are an artist, for the sake of the art; or give the knowledge acquired professionally to those who need it for nothing […]

By derision – a bad word, but once again the English language is much in need of new words – is meant that you must refuse all methods of advertising merit, and hold that ridicule, obscurity and censure are preferable, for psychological reasons, to fame and praise. Directly badges, orders or degrees are offered you, fling them back in the giver’s face.

By freedom from unreal loyalties is meant that you must rid yourself of pride of nationality in the first place; also of religious pride, college pride, school pride, family pride, sex pride and those unreal loyalties that spring from them. Directly the seducers come with their seductions to bribe you into captivity, tear up the parchments; refuse to fill up the forms.”

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One Comment on “As a woman, I have no country”

  1. ianchisnall says:

    A great piece Dani, I so wish that the 54 men and women would take the time to read and digest your comments and realise how much we want them all to move from their uncomfortable but familiar vantage points to a place of shared humanity with the residents of the city in greatest need. Sadly I don’t think many will get it, even if a few do take the time to read!


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